Oral Histories

Primary Subject: Personal History

Deone Skewes

Deone Skewes

b.1920

They don’t know whether he had a heart attack and fell and broke his neck or whether he had a heart attack in the tree and … they didn’t know which came first, you know.   Anyway, these two little boys, I believe one of them was Tom Stocks came running in our back door to the telephone. Mother didn’t know what these kids were doing in her house.

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Clara Shafer

Clara Copley Shafer

b.1930

It went to Park City with empty oar cars and usually came back with full ore cars or sometimes coal because, as I said, it was a coal mining town for a while. There is still coal in Coalville but it is too expensive to mine it. It’s not worth it. It’s a good grade of coal but there is a lot of water seepage into the mines and they would have to pump so much and stabilize the mines and it is not worth while. The cars coming back from Park City were loaded with silver from the silver mines. I think they were being taken to the smelter as I don’t remember a smelter in Park City.

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Ferne Mullen

Ferne J. Mullen

b. 1919

So then I started working there. And we were so busy. They were building the mill and the mines were going. They had this building thing on. Building a railroad. Building houses and a grocery store. There was only one little grocery store run by a local, let’s see, Miller’s little grocery store. Down on the corner where that restaurant is now (northwest corner of Main and Center Streets). And, it had one street and it turned up past the Court House and wandered out toward Spanish Valley. They were building roads. 

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Bill & Inalyn Meador

Inalyn Meador

b.1934

That was after I had graduated. I was working at the Arches Café, which is where the old Center Café was, right across from the telephone company. There was a big ball room and the café was on the side where Center Café was. While I was working there, the girl that was doing the doubling for Joanne Dru – her boyfriend was killed- so she didn’t want to work and so they asked me if I would. I was just there in the café, so I went. 

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Bill Meador

Bill Meador

b.1933

The superintendency is extremely time consuming. I spent a lot of time at evening meetings, on the telephone at my home, those kinds of things. I did belong to Rotary. I belonged to Elks for a while and said that’s one more than I can keep up with. The nature of the job says to you, “Stay out of politics.” You have to be someone in a neutral enough position that you can meet with and relate to whomever. In a small town also, your social life is very restricted. It was easier for Lyn and me to stay home than to go and listen to someone complain about Mrs. Brown’s history class. And so, it was just a lot easier to get a good book.

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Ruby Zufelt

Ruby Ray Tangreen Zufelt

b. 1908

Dad filed on a desert claim south of Price, and he made a cellar, then he built a log cabin. It was so hot. I think it was two years after that they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. It was so hot in the summer and the midwife said, “Well, Susie, why don’t you put your bed down in the cellar where it’s cooler. It’s so hot up here.” That’s what she did and I was born in the dugout. Then the dam went out and the irrigation project failed, so Dad gave up the homestead and went to work in the mine.

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Mel & Ida Dalton

Melvin S. Dalton

b.1923

Basically, I ran a dry cleaning plant for 11 years. I worked at Atlas minerals, the uranium plant, for 11 years. I was chief of police for 11 years. I like that eleven stuff, I guess. Then I was over Atlas Security for 5 years.

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Alan D. “Tug” Wilson

b.1936

Sure, there were a lot of people who wanted someone to guide them to things like the Mastodon, to guide them to Park Avenue. The entrance road did not switchback up behind the rock house in those days and it was quite a hike to Park Avenue. So I was often hired to carry their water, or their cameras to Double O or to Delicate or elsewhere as well as guide the clients. In those days it was quite primitive and the Moab area was very different compared to what visitors had experienced elsewhere. Also the visitors were probably 50+ . During these outings I perfected the ability to walk backwards on the trails and talk to the visitors I was guiding.

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Pancho & Elsie Tabberer

Frank “Pancho” Tabberer

b.1930

That’s one of the customers that Bud Walter Inc, was an _______distributor and we sold explosives to Charlie Steen, Bill McCormick, all the individual mines from 60 to63. In 1963 things started slowing down. They started backing off on some of the mines and Bud Walter wanted me to move back to Farmington. And I didn’t want to move back to Farmington, so another company, W H Burt Explosives, the company that we eventually bought, offered me a job. He wanted to send me to Riverton WY to run the location up there and I accepted that job. Went to Riverton for a year and then I went back to Farmington for four years, and then back to Moab in spring of 68, we bought W H Burt Explosives.

 

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Maxine Newell & George Andersen

Maxine Newell

b. 1919

… And the helicopter pilot had come in from the north and he saw some activity down below so he dipped down and this man was down there waving to him. So they set down and picked up the injured hiker who had made himself a crutch and had a broken leg and they brought him in and sat him right at the back door before the posse had a chance to go out. Well, that was a celebration. We all ate ham sandwiches for breakfast. I might add that a helicopter landing strip had been improvised and when the copter ignored it and landed at the Visitors’ Center, I said, “How do we expect him to find a lost hiker when he can’t even find the landing strip?” My face is still red.

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