Moab Museum | BLOG

Moab History: The Construction of the Dalton Wells CCC Camp

February 22, 2024
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Before the 1943 incarceration of Japanese Americans and Moab’s role in these national-scale events, the Dalton Wells area north of Moab had another use: a Civilian Conservation Corps camp.  This week, we continue our exploration of the Fall/Winter 1993 issue of the Canyon Legacy and Bruce D. Louthan’s work exploring Dalton Wells’ history as a…

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Moab History: The CCC Camp at Dalton Wells– a precursor

February 15, 2024
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As the Museum launches into the history and lasting legacy of the 1943 incarceration of Japanese Americans and Moab’s role in these national-scale events, we turn to the Fall/Winter 1993 Issue of the Canyon Legacy and Bruce D. Louthan’s work exploring Dalton Wells’ history as a CCC Camp. What was Dalton Wells before a Moab…

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Harry Yoshio Ueno: Incarcerated at Dalton Wells in 1943

February 8, 2024
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During World War II, the U.S. Government incarcerated more than 120,000 Japanese American citizens and Japanese nationals living in the Western U.S. The War Relocation Authority (WRA) established Citizen Isolation Centers to isolate alleged “troublemakers” from the larger incarceration camps, including one at Dalton Wells, 14 miles north of Moab. Harry Yoshio Ueno was one…

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Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County – An Overview

February 1, 2024
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On February 17, the Moab Museum is hosting a public opening to our latest temporary exhibition, exploring the troubling story of Japanese Americans incarcerated at Dalton Wells, north of town in 1943. A Moab Prison Camp: Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County introduces the local and national story of Japanese American incarceration during WWII, following the bombing…

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Moab History: Profiling Two Modern Basket Weavers

January 18, 2024
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The Moab Museum is proud to display ten striking Diné (Navajo)-woven baskets through the end of the current temporary exhibition. The baskets are on loan from the Twin Rocks Trading Post in Bluff, UT. In this week’s column, we explore two of the weavers whose work is featured this month at the Museum.  Lorraine Black…

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Tara Beresh Museum Curatorial and Collections Manager hangs a basket from the Twin Rocks Trading Post Collection.

Twin Rocks Trading Post Basket Collection On Display Through February

January 11, 2024
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The Museum is proud to exhibit ten striking baskets from the Twin Rocks Trading Post Collection for one month following our annual winter closure, until February 10th. Before there were Rugs According to Navajo oral history, the earliest weaving began in basketry. Baskets (ts’aa’) were made from three-leafed sumac for domestic and ceremonial use using…

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Moab History: Curating new exhibits and local stories for the North Gallery

December 14, 2023
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The Museum’s current floor plan features two spaces: the north gallery which exhibits objects from Moab’s history across time, and the south gallery which introduces special, temporary exhibitions. These south gallery exhibits last four to six months each, though sometimes the Museum features smaller “pop-up” and community-curated exhibitions such as the Quilt Show, which has…

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Moab History Collections Spotlight: Current Meter

December 7, 2023
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Delving into the heart of our cherished Collection, this week’s installment of the Moab History column invites you to unearth the stories behind the artifacts that encapsulate Moab’s diverse and captivating history. Step into the fascinating world of our heritage through the lens of these remarkable pieces, beginning with this United States Geological Survey Current Meter and…

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Sheep shearing Museum Collection Volume 10

Moab History: The Sheep Wars

December 1, 2023
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Sheep have a long, multifaceted legacy in the Southwest. Navajo Churro sheep, introduced by Spanish colonists in the 1500s, became an important part of Navajo culture – evident today in the annual “Sheep is Life” celebration of the hardy breed. Also, across the West, sheepherders grazed hundreds of thousands of sheep in the late 1800s…

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Moab History: The Robidoux Inscription

November 23, 2023
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Westwater Creek road follows the waterway through the hills, about five miles west of the Utah-Colorado border. Along the west side of the creek, an inscription stands about 9 feet tall and 4 and a half feet wide. It reads:  “Antoine Robidouxpasse ici le 13 Novembre1837pour etablire maisontraitte a laRv. vert ou wiyte” Translated from…

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A complete list of Moab History columns can be found in the Moab Sun News