Moab History: The 1855 Elk Mountain Mission

Driven from their communities east of the Mississippi River because of religious persecution, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) settled in the Salt Lake City area of northern Utah and southwestern Wyoming where farming was bountiful. From this base, missions were sent out to surrounding areas establishing communities and wrestling…

Read More

Moab History: Incarcerees and War Heroes

While Japanese Americans were incarcerated during WWII, many also fought bravely in the war. The 442ndRegimental Combat Team, a segregated Japanese American military unit, is honored today as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of the US military.  President Roosevelt activated the 442nd Regimental Combat Team on February…

Read More

Delicate Stitchers Quilt Guild Annual Show

The Delicate Stitchers Quilt Guild displays a variety of themed quilts at the Museum beginning Saturday, July 6th for their annual quilt show. The quilts will be on display in the South Gallery through August 17, 2024 with a FREE public opening on Friday, August 2nd during the Moab Arts Art Walk. Also, stop by…

Read More

Moab History: A Fossil of Two Sharks

Amidst an array of fossils on display at the Museum, a small, inconspicuous gray rock contains teeth from two remarkable predators. While dinosaurs often claim the limelight of local paleontology, Utah’s rocks record many different chapters of Earth’s history in their layers – including intervals of time when the region was covered with shallow seas.…

Read More

Moab History: Moab Regional Hospital

Moab Regional Hospital

Moab’s medical history is defined by dedicated caregivers both inside and outside hospital walls. From doctors making house calls on horseback to nurses hosting supply drives during pandemics, the Moab community has been adapting to rural healthcare challenges for over a century. This week, Museum staff highlight the current iteration of health care in the Moab…

Read More

Moab History: I. W. Allen Memorial Hospital

I. W. Allen Memorial Lab

Moab’s medical history is defined by dedicated caregivers both inside and outside hospital walls. From doctors making house calls on horseback to nurses hosting supply drives during pandemics, the Moab community has been adapting to rural healthcare challenges for over a century.  The Moab Museum is proud to exhibit a new satellite exhibition at the…

Read More

Moab History: Legacy of Care – The Grand County Hospital 

Moab’s medical history is defined by dedicated caregivers both inside and outside hospital walls. From doctors making house calls on horseback to nurses hosting supply drives during pandemics, the Moab community has been adapting to rural healthcare challenges for over a century.  The Moab Museum is proud to exhibit a new satellite exhibition at the…

Read More

Dr. Koji Lau Ozawa: “Archaeology of the Gila River War Relocation Center”

Dr. Koji Lau-Ozawa, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at UCLA whose research focuses on the history and archeology of WWII Japanese American incarceration presented to Museum guests on Thursday May 9th. Dr. Lau-Ozawa’s dissertation research at Stanford focused on the Gila River Incarceration Camp, where he worked in collaboration with the Gila River Indian Community to…

Read More

Moab History: Peach Days

Around the turn of the twentieth century, Moab was a small, isolated agricultural community – and orchards were both a big business and a source of local pride in the valley. Moab peaches were a delicious and profitable crop and were exported to Colorado markets and beyond. Early settlers attempted to bolster the fruit-growing enterprise…

Read More

Moab History: Cattle Drives

A century ago, traffic jams in Moab looked very different than today. Cattle – not cars – clogged streets seasonally, as ranchers brought livestock through the Moab Valley on their way to the railroad in Thompson. What was it like driving cattle through town? What was it like for locals when hundreds of cows passed…

Read More